I’ve read a great deal (most from you, but others too) and one thing (I think) that I want to do is divide my site into two or three parts with distinctly different content (i.e. blog, autobiographical anecdotes, literary letters to my heirs, etc.) First I guess — is this a good idea or a really bad one? Second, how do I do that on one site or should I try to juggle multiples? Thanks!


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I’d like also to incorporate a feature to facilitate access to Google Translate — possibly by linked “button” to open it in a new tab, although the ideal would allow highlighting of text, selection of the translator button, automatic copying of text into the translator app, auto-selection of target language as that of the column in which it is highlighted, and display of the translation in a sub-window that could be dismissed by clicking elsewhere on the page. I imagine it would be simpler if the reader were required to highlight and copy the text manually to paste it into the translation-app tab, and use its native features to select the target language. One use of this feature would be to translate terms or phrases from other languages that are embedded within the text of one of the two primary-language columns.
WordPress users may install and switch among different themes. Themes allow users to change the look and functionality of a WordPress website without altering the core code or site content. Every WordPress website requires at least one theme to be present and every theme should be designed using WordPress standards with structured PHP, valid HTML (HyperText Markup Language), and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Themes may be directly installed using the WordPress "Appearance" administration tool in the dashboard, or theme folders may be copied directly into the themes directory, for example via FTP.[16] The PHP, HTML and CSS found in themes can be directly modified to alter theme behavior, or a theme can be a "child" theme which inherits settings from another theme and selectively overrides features.[17] WordPress themes are generally classified into two categories: free and premium. Many free themes are listed in the WordPress theme directory, and premium themes are available for purchase from marketplaces and individual WordPress developers. WordPress users may also create and develop their own custom themes. The free theme Underscores created by the WordPress developers has become a popular basis for new themes.[18]
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