Create a basic logo using a program like InDesign or Photoshop or a text editor (note: even though we have no design skills, we were able to use Apple’s Pages application to create our simple logo after downloading some free vector art and choosing the typeface/font [Helvetica Neue] that best suited our aesthetic), or you can hire someone like 99designs to design a professional logo.

In May 2007, a study revealed that 98% of WordPress blogs being run were exploitable because they were running outdated and unsupported versions of the software.[92] In part to mitigate this problem, WordPress made updating the software a much easier, "one click" automated process in version 2.7 (released in December 2008).[93] However, the filesystem security settings required to enable the update process can be an additional risk.[94]
Run by Brian Jackson (a serious WordPress and SEO guru), Woorkup is definitely a solid WordPress resource. If you’re ever unsure about a plugin, or you’re looking for some inspiration give Brian’s blog a read. He also share freelancer tips for running a business based on his own personal experiences and has a toolbox of recommended products to help you get started.
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Run by Brian Jackson (a serious WordPress and SEO guru), Woorkup is definitely a solid WordPress resource. If you’re ever unsure about a plugin, or you’re looking for some inspiration give Brian’s blog a read. He also share freelancer tips for running a business based on his own personal experiences and has a toolbox of recommended products to help you get started.
Prior to version 3, WordPress supported one blog per installation, although multiple concurrent copies may be run from different directories if configured to use separate database tables. WordPress Multisites (previously referred to as WordPress Multi-User, WordPress MU, or WPMU) was a fork of WordPress created to allow multiple blogs to exist within one installation but is able to be administered by a centralized maintainer. WordPress MU makes it possible for those with websites to host their own blogging communities, as well as control and moderate all the blogs from a single dashboard. WordPress MS adds eight new data tables for each blog.
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