With all WordPress.com sites you can sell your handmade products, art, books, or digital products such as ebooks or courses on your site using your PayPal account. You can also solicit donations or tips from your readers using the PayPal button or link. For more information on setting up a PayPal button or link in your content, please refer to our step by step guide.
WordPress also features integrated link management; a search engine–friendly, clean permalink structure; the ability to assign multiple categories to posts; and support for tagging of posts. Automatic filters are also included, providing standardized formatting and styling of text in posts (for example, converting regular quotes to smart quotes). WordPress also supports the Trackback and Pingback standards for displaying links to other sites that have themselves linked to a post or an article. WordPress posts can be edited in HTML, using the visual editor, or using one of a number of plugins that allow for a variety of customized editing features.

Let’s first check whether the code is inserted where we expect it. When you are logged in as administrator you’ll see admin toolbar above every post or page and there should be Ad Inserter menu item with debugging functions to diagnose common issues. Go to any post where the ads should be displayed and click on Ad Inserter / Label Blocks in admin toolbar. 
AdSense is the best ad network for bloggers, and I have already shared a guide on How to create an AdSense account. For existing users, adding AdSense code in a blog is not a task, but if I recall my earlier days, I was not sure how to use AdSense dashboard, and how to add it on my blog. When it comes to WordPress, there are many plugins like Whytodowork AdSense, Quick AdSense, which will let you quickly integrate ads at your desire position. To be honest, I find plugins are easier to do things on WordPress over manual Work. Until, unless you know PHP, and understand WordPress theme structure.
WordPress (WordPress.org) is a free and open-source content management system (CMS) based on PHP and MySQL.[4] Features include a plugin architecture and a template system. It is most associated with blogging but supports other types of web content including more traditional mailing lists and forums, media galleries, and online stores. Used by more than 60 million websites,[5] including 30.6% of the top 10 million websites as of April 2018,[6][7] WordPress is the most popular website management system in use.[8] WordPress has also been used for other application domains such as pervasive display systems (PDS).[9]
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