I’ve read a great deal (most from you, but others too) and one thing (I think) that I want to do is divide my site into two or three parts with distinctly different content (i.e. blog, autobiographical anecdotes, literary letters to my heirs, etc.) First I guess — is this a good idea or a really bad one? Second, how do I do that on one site or should I try to juggle multiples? Thanks!

Seamless support on the goNeedless to say, when you are dealing with AdSense, you are actually working with one of the top companies – Google. Rest assured, you can clear all your queries and doubts by accessing related customer forums. AdSense is very easy to get started with, even for beginners. There are tons of video and text tutorials, even websites that can help you become a pro in this field.
Since creating this blog eight years ago, we’ve garnered an audience of more than 20 million. Perhaps the most important lesson learned was that starting a blog was much easier than we thought. Thankfully, you needn’t be tech savvy (we certainly aren’t). You don’t need to know how to code or design (we still don’t). You don’t need much money (you can get your domain for free and host your site for just a few bucks a month). And you don’t need to spend a ton of time either (you can set up your blog in less than an hour).
In this example we’ll check insertion of AdSense ad before the second paragraph. When function Label Blocks is enabled Ad Inserter will put a red frame around each code block so you will see it even if the ad code doesn’t display anything. In our case we see that the code block 10 (AdSense Post) is inserted properly (before paragraph 2), however the code doesn’t show anything. Label Blocks function will also mark AdSense ad blocks with green transparent overlay and ad block information: AdSense ad index, ad format, ad slot ID and if AdSense integration is enabled also ad unit name. This confirms two things:
WordPress' plugin architecture allows users to extend the features and functionality of a website or blog. As of March 2017, WordPress has over 55,286 plugins available,[19] each of which offers custom functions and features enabling users to tailor their sites to their specific needs. These customizations range from search engine optimization, to client portals used to display private information to logged in users, to content management systems, to content displaying features, such as the addition of widgets and navigation bars. Not all available plugins are always abreast with the upgrades and as a result they may not function properly or may not function at all. Most plugins are available through WordPress themselves, either via downloading them and installing the files manually via FTP or through the WordPress dashboard. However, many third parties offer plugins through their own websites, many of which are paid packages.
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