Open source and supported by many tools: WordPress is an open-source platform, so it is free. You can download it from Wordpress.org and install it in minutes if you have your own server. The last part can be a hurdle for some who are not experienced in website development, but the support community for this tool is immense with more than a decade's worth of updates, plug-ins, themes, and third-party tools that integrate with it.
Matilda is a wonderful personal blog WordPress theme with a minimal feel, elegance and loads of professionalism. It is the best fit for every lifestyle blogger out there, however, Matilda can also smoothly adapt to other niches. In the Matilda package, you receive a total of 32 HTML files of which eight are neat home variations. That said, go with what is available and have a blog up and running in a breeze. Or improve and customize it with your individual touch. To each their own.
If you want to have a public-facing blog but want to remain anonymous, then you need to make sure that your domain has WHOIS privacy turned on. Often people use a pseudonym / nickname to write under. You should also create a unique email just for your blog. It goes without saying, don’t post your pictures or anything on the blog. For more detailed instructions, see our article on how to blog anonymously using WordPress.
WordPress' plugin architecture allows users to extend the features and functionality of a website or blog. As of March 2017, WordPress has over 55,286 plugins available,[19] each of which offers custom functions and features enabling users to tailor their sites to their specific needs. These customizations range from search engine optimization, to client portals used to display private information to logged in users, to content management systems, to content displaying features, such as the addition of widgets and navigation bars. Not all available plugins are always abreast with the upgrades and as a result they may not function properly or may not function at all. Most plugins are available through WordPress themselves, either via downloading them and installing the files manually via FTP or through the WordPress dashboard. However, many third parties offer plugins through their own websites, many of which are paid packages.
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