If you sell things using WordPress, you likely use WooCommerce. If that’s the case, then you should subscribe to the WooCommerce official blog. Not only will you get development updates and know what’s coming so you can prepare your store, they also publish lots of best practices and business tips that have been tested and tend to work really well with the software.
Not only are they one of the most trusted security plugins in the WordPress world, they also have one of the best WordPress blogs out there, too. When something blows up (not literally of course, but then again you never know with hackers) regarding WordPress, Sucuri will have a blog about it. You should check in occasionally to make sure you’re up to date on the latest threats (and their fixes) to your workspace and livelihood.

Last, you’re in control of your own content. Some other publishing platforms limit what you can and can’t do on your own website. And, you’re locked in to that service; if it should ever shut down, your content could simply disappear. With WordPress, you can import your data from other platforms like Blogger or Tumblr, and you can easily export your data to move away from WordPress, anytime you choose. You’re in control of your content.
The primary feature of this release is the new editor that will become the default WordPress experience going forward. A number of people have been seeking more direct feedback from the release leads about the progress of this release, which @matt has facilitated by hosting one-to-one discussions with anyone in the community who wanted to talk with him about it. He has also published an extended FAQ covering many of the questions people have been asking.
Himmelen is one of the best blogging themes for WordPress websites. It is simple and elegant, capable of improving your page and complementing your content. You will be able to chronicle your experiences or weave incredible stories with ease. Himmelen also offers a limitless number of blog styles and variations for the page layout: 5 blog listing layouts, multiple header styles and 2 featured post slider layouts.
Prior to version 3, WordPress supported one blog per installation, although multiple concurrent copies may be run from different directories if configured to use separate database tables. WordPress Multisites (previously referred to as WordPress Multi-User, WordPress MU, or WPMU) was a fork of WordPress created to allow multiple blogs to exist within one installation but is able to be administered by a centralized maintainer. WordPress MU makes it possible for those with websites to host their own blogging communities, as well as control and moderate all the blogs from a single dashboard. WordPress MS adds eight new data tables for each blog.
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